Later on, the Swiss chalet style became a prevailing influence in Icelandic architecture as many timber buildings were constructed in this way. . You can go inside the houses where beds and homie things have been laid out. How to Spend 4 Days in Iceland in Winter? Iceland was settled in 874 AD by Norse and British settlers who were familiar with turf. The farmstead is still inhabited and was modernized in the 20 th century with new dwelling houses and stables and is still an inhabited vicarage. In the 14th century the Viking style longhouses were gradually abandoned, replaced by many smaller and specialised buildings which interconnected. The Romans built with turf (grass) to create fortresses in the northern parts of their empire. The Icelandic Turf-house Project is a restoration and an exhibition project about Icelandic turf-house heritage that aims to explore it from different vantage points, including the aesthetic. Around half of the Icelandic nation still lived in turf houses in 1910. East Iceland has relatively few turf houses left standing, but you will find them in Bustarfell, which is a museum that has captured farm life and turf house living from the 16 th Century. It is a small cluster of houses, extremely well kept and the artifacts inside tell a dazzling story of life once lives. It was, therefore, something they recognized and appreciated. Over the centuries these structures were adapted to suit the Icelandic climate, and … This is the main material used for roof material from the 19th century and actually served as a wonderful insulation against the wind and cold. A typical Icelandic turf farm was a cluster of buildings connected by earth corridors. Only 3 available and it's in 1 person's cart. It is where one of the characters in the famous Brennu-Njals Saga lived (Ingjaldur Hoskuldsson) which only adds to its historic value. Some are from Laufas but others come from the neighboring farms. 4 Bdrm House For Sale ISK 4,914,525. By the end of the 19th century, a reign of 11 hundred years of turf houses in Iceland had come to an end. Keldur turf-farm and an employee from the National Museum Inequality has always been with us. There, visitors can take in a preserved turf farm, getting a glimpse into the past. Our mission is to create a nest of innovative & exclusive travel products you can only find at our website. Rooted strongly in the Icelandic culture, would you stay in a turf house? Those would often house a special chimney so that the smoke from the turf houses’ only fire could escape. The Icelandic Turf House Institute is located in Árnessýslu, about an hour’s drive southeast from Reykjavik. It is the perfect place for families or simply someone curious about the old times. Fisherman’s turf house. In the 12th and 13th century, Keldur was one of the manors of the most powerful clans in Iceland; the Oddi clan. We can't wait for summer to arrive, how about you? icelandic history and folk museum, skogar, iceland - icelandic turf house stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images Iceland Skogasafn Turf Houses and church in South Iceland Skogar Museum for tourists and old houses The Icelandic Turf House, Selfoss: See 60 reviews, articles, and 58 photos of The Icelandic Turf House, ranked No.5 on Tripadvisor among 15 attractions in Selfoss. Slowly, people moved into a more modern urban building style of wooden houses, clad in corrugated iron. This was called baðstofa, or basically the “bath living room”. Over the last years the participants of this seminar have helped in restoring Tyrfingsstaðir, a turf house deserted in 1969. Another highlight for me was also an Icelandic waffle with cream and jam at the end of each visit. Sign up for our newsletter and receive special offers and deals (function() { Laufas and Glaumbaer are two Icelandic turf houses that give a good impression of Icelandic life before the advent of timber or concrete houses in the 20th century. One of the more exciting things to explore at Keldur is the oldest remaining structure in Iceland. Jón Loftsson, one of the most powerful chieftains in Iceland in the 12th century, and lived at Keldur until his death in 1197. A lot, it seems. They remained the most common form of housing in Iceland until the 20th century, when urbanization and modernization took the country by storm. The museum is open from the 13th of May until the 1st of October, daily from 9 am to 5 pm. on: function (event, callback) { The Icelandic Turf House, Selfoss: See 60 reviews, articles, and 58 photos of The Icelandic Turf House, ranked No.5 on Tripadvisor among 15 attractions in Selfoss. She loves educating others about her findings or her home country, Iceland. Later, in the 18th century, a new Burstabaer style started to gain momentum, the most common version of the Icelandic turf house. Not to mention how easily accessible it is with public bus from downtown Reykjavik. After World War I, a wave of modernisation swept the island and nearly eradicated the turf houses. Although the methods of turf building in Iceland are fairly unique to the island. These buildings are biodegradable, eco-friendly and energy-efficient. The sturdy walls were made of stone sandwiched between turf bricks, sometimes played out in a fashionable herringbone style. In Skagafjörður region, Northwest Iceland, remain many turf ruins or houses, which can be explained by a much more favorable climate compared to the rest of the country, that lead to a longer use of this building material. They were then reconstructed and fixed in their own distinctive way giving visitors a magnificent insight into the different architecture that these buildings could actually possess. It was of course prevalent in Iceland in the rural society that was the norm until the middle of the twentieth century. A wooden frame would firstly be built, limiting the need for wood greatly. Bustarfell turf house in East-Iceland is one of the country's best-preserved turf houses and the only one of the big turf houses, which is painted in a beautiful red colour. Later on, the family of Oddi including Jon Loftsson who raised the infamous Snorri Sturluson came to recite at Keldur. Keldur is the oldest turf house in Iceland and is beautifully well kept. Easy to maintain, the turf roofs and walls needed to be trimmed regularly but the structures do collapse eventually and need to either be rebuilt or repaired. The extraordinary turf houses at Keldur farm have been built many times over and ruins of about 18 farmsteads have been discovered throughout the years. This is the main material used for roof material from the 19th century and actually served as a wonderful insulation against the wind and cold. Ragnheiður studied Anthropology with a minor in Media so it might not come as much of a surprise that she is curious in nature. At night people would gather in the largest room, the only one heated up with fire and tell each other stories, knit and make wool and skin products. Hotels near The Icelandic Turf House: (9.28 km) 360 Hotel (9.00 km) Guesthouse Heba (8.23 km) Lambastadir Guesthouse (7.87 km) Thoristun Apartments (6.94 km) Gesthus Selfoss; View all hotels near The Icelandic Turf House on Tripadvisor The oldest turf house in Iceland is the historical farm of Keldur on the South Coast of Iceland. Located about an hour’s drive from Reykjavik, The Icelandic Turf House Institute allows visitors an insight about these houses through their preserved turf farms. Icelandic Turf Houses. The Icelandic turf house was given a help in its preservation in 2011 when turf housing was nominated for UNESCO World Heritage status. event : event, 22 farms are believed to have been evacuated during this eruption, leaving the fjord quite. Keldur is the oldest turf house in Iceland and is beautifully well kept. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. The only additional wood to be added would be for doors and doorways. Litlibaer farm was built in 1895 by two families that then lived in separate ends of the building. They remained the most common form of housing in Iceland until the 20th century, when urbanization and modernization took the country by storm. Outside were two outdoor kitchen and the farmers would fish in the nearby fjord. The Icelandic turf houses were the product of the difficult climate. Even so, you can still find preserved turf houses around Iceland. Icelandic Translation for Icelandic turf house - dict.cc English-Icelandic Dictionary It is open from the 1st of June until the 31st of August from 10 am to 5 pm. The Icelandic Turf House: the Jewel of Arctic Architecture. So, even though our neighboring Scandinavian countries used oak to build their homes Icelanders would use their darling birch. Turf houses took a lot of maintenance and so sadly not many are still standing. The farm has a long history tracing back to the middle ages and some of the artifacts at the museum will have a similar story to tell. See the glorious waterfall and visit the beautifully reconstructed turf houses. Turf houses or torfbaeir as they are called in Icelandic were largely made up from flat stones, wood, turf and soil. Keldur farm is a historical place of important for Iceland Saga of Njáll, Ingjaldur Höskuldsson, who lived here from 974 until around 1000. The sturdy walls were made of stone sandwiched between turf bricks, sometimes played out in a fashionable herringbone style. All the warmth in the home was provided by the fire in the kitchen since heating from coal, oil, or wood stoves was not available until the 19th century. Truth is, it became the traditional and most followed way of building in Iceland. All the warmth in the home was provided by the fire in the kitchen since heating from coal, oil, or wood stoves was not available until the 19. century. Today you can visit to get to know life in the rural Westfjords at this time and it is a great stop for some coffee and cake. HOUSE SÚÐAVÍK. The only exposed wood was at the doorway where the frame was decorated. We will be celebrating the first day of Summer in Laufás this Thursday between 1pm and 5pm, free entrance! 10 Most Famous Landmarks in Iceland | The Must See’s. Keldur has been rebuilt many times over the c… Because most of Iceland lacked trees, timber was not a viable resource for building. . Both are fully furnished and have become museums for Icelanders and tourists to learn about Icelanders’ history. The frame is then clad with turf, often in two layers to help insulate. In fact, earth-sheltered dwellings have been in use since at least the Iron Age. These turf homes were lived in right up until the 1960s so you will gain an understanding of how turf houses were modernised with the addition of electricity and toilets. All members of the family lived and spent their time together in the living room, the only room with a window, where they ate, slept, were born, and died. The place is open for visitors in summer and surely a great spot to check out! Turf House . The turf house is now one of the more iconic buildings in Iceland. Icelandic turf house. if (!window.mc4wp) { Many houses in this style still stand, and have become the iconic Icelandic turf house. At this time turf roofs were already known in Norway, where most of the settlers were coming from. Turf houses are not unique to Iceland, they have been constructed throughout many centuries in Europe, Greenland, North America and the Faroe Islands. Bustarfell is a huge turf house and consists of 17 houses, but each gable and outhouse counts as one unit. Hotels near The Icelandic Turf House: (5.80 mi) 360 Hotel (5.63 mi) Guesthouse Heba (5.14 mi) Lambastadir Guesthouse (4.92 mi) Thoristun Apartments (4.34 mi) Gesthus Selfoss; View all hotels near The Icelandic Turf House on Tripadvisor callback: callback In fact, earth-sheltered dwellings have been in use since at least the Iron Age. After making our way through the waist-deep snow for more than a kilometre, we arrived at this tiny abandoned turf house. }); When the houses do collapse, they only leave a mound of earth behind. Not only did the turf offer premium insulation exceeding wood or stone but it was also much easier to come by. Secondly was the turf that would be laid down, often in a herringbone style and in two layers to seal the insulation. A post shared by Sigríður Ákadóttir (@sigridurakadottir) on Aug 19, 2019 at 9:49am PDT. In the year 1890, over 87% of the population lived in turf farms in the countryside. I remember roaming around in the museum as a kid and just feeling amazed by the way of life that my ancestors lived. #skogarmuseum #skogar #openairmuseum #safn #húsasafn #southiceland #suðurland #meetthelocals #drone #dróni #dronestagram #turffarm #torfbær, A post shared by Skógasafn – Skogar Museum (@skogarmuseum) on May 24, 2019 at 11:12am PDT. Within its turf walls, you can find the most amazing clues into the life in the North in the old age displayed in an almost unbelievably real matter. A typical Icelandic turf farm was a cluster of buildings connected by earth corridors. In addition, the ruins of around 18 farmsteads have also been found on this site. Turf houses had been continually constructed over a period of 1000 years but Icelandic architecture changed a lot in that time. The more sturdy of houses could often last from 50 to 70 years. Secondly was the turf that would be laid down, often in a herringbone style and in two layers to seal the insulation. The unique feature about Skogar is that they are actually several turf houses from other areas that have been moved. Dating as far back as 900 AD, turf structures have played an important role in the history of Iceland. Seen today, turf houses are green-cloaked homes with grass on the roofs that are laid into the natural landscape. *this photo was taken last summer* #laufas #laufás #grenivik #grenivík #akureyri #eyjafjordur #eyjafjörður #icelandic #iceland #northiceland #visitakureyri #visiticeland #turf #turfhouse #turfhome #lovethisplace, A post shared by Gamli bærinn Laufás (@laufasmuseum) on Feb 23, 2019 at 4:02am PST. The flooring was typically wood, stone or just earth, depending on the buildings purpose. As a result, grass- and turf-covered houses were developed. That gave them an opportunity to build from better material and maintain at a higher level. window.mc4wp = { Through the rough climate and isolation, the turf houses kept the Vikings warm and throughout 11 hundred years until the houses, you might see today were built. Right next to the settlement is then the pride and joy, the church. Icelandic Turf Houses. The oldest turf house in Iceland is the historical farm of Keldur on the South Coast of Iceland. During the 12 th and 13 th centuries, Keldur was home to the Oddi clan, one of the powerful families in Iceland during the Free State era. As an adult, I still recommend it! The traditional Iceland turf house would have a large foundation made of flat stones, and a wooden frame which would hold the turf. How they were built, how they were lived in, their origin and cultural context, contemporary significance, subtlety and beauty.